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Indigo Prophecy is a creative, ambitious and fantastic experience, despite its noticeable flaws.

7.5

Great
Difficulty:
Hard
Time Spent:
10 Hours or Less
The Bottom Line:
"Innovative"

Summary

SCORE: 7.8/10

Pros:
+Sets the mould for cinematic experiences to come
+A twisting story that keeps you guessing
+Often impressive graphics and attention to detail
+A fantastic soundtrack that fits the game very well
+Great voice acting and character development
+Different endings mean more replay value

Cons:
-Exceptionally frustrating camera
-Clunky, unwieldy controls
-The story makes some incredibly odd turns, not always for the better
-There is a lot of trial-and-error needed in certain sections
-Some missions aren't nearly as entertaining as others

Review:

What would you do if a man was murdered right before your eyes...and the murderer happens to be you? That is the question Indigo Prophecy wants you to answer in this compelling, supernatural mystery that you will remember for years to come. The game has its share of flaws, but if you're looking for an engrossing, innovative and different adventure, you can't go wrong with IP. It's rough around the edges, but manages to still be amazing more than 4 years after its release.

The game starts with Lucas Kane, speaking of something he has recently experienced. After the initial monologue, most of the game occurs in a memory. Lucas Kane wakes up from a deep sleep, and notices a body lying on the ground. Flustered, he then realises that he's holding a bloody knife and is bleeding from the arms. You are tasked with getting rid of all incriminating evidence and then making a quick escape without arousing any sort of attention. This series of events acts both as a tutorial and stirring opening. Lucas Kane has no recollection of ever committing the gruesome murder, and will stop at nothing to clear his name. The story is much like a clever blend of thriller and mystery elements, and does a great job at presenting the narrative. Lucas is a character that is easy to empathize with. He's an everyday man, at the wrong place at the wrong time, and he never feels too extreme as a character.

Lucas isn't the only character you'll play as, however. There are a number of other characters you can play as throughout the game, changing the perspective from which you experience the story. The other two main characters are Carla Valenti and Tyler Miles, both members of the police that are in hot pursuit of Lucas. The role reversal, from the pursuer to the one being pursued, makes you think more of what side is right, and which is wrong. You might start feeling conflicted, not knowing who to root for. That's a pristine example of how much effort has been put into the story as a whole.

Unfortunately, it isn't perfect. Once you get further into the story, it starts getting far more difficult to understand. In fact, some points of the story aren't explained in any way, which really spoils the otherwise sublime experience.

What greatly helps the story to be so amazing, despite the often baffling plot directions, is how fantastic the characters are. Lucas isn't the only character that is focused on in the story. You'll get to know the deepest intricacies of
each character and see them develop as they experience a number of difficult situations. Every decision made in the game shapes how the game will be played from then on out, and will also shape the fate of every character. It's with this level of professionalism in how the story is told that Indigo Prophecy tells such an unforgettable tale.

Of course, it's not all about the story. There are, in fact, relatively few cutscenes that you can't affect in some way. Almost everything in the game is controlled by the analog sticks. You move with the left stick, and the right stick reacts according to what happens to be near you at any time. When close to a door, for example, you can open it by pushing the right stick in a set direction. It's not the most simple or efficient of systems, since constantly pushing the analog sticks in quick succession can get tiring, but it works in the context of the game's infrastructure.

Much of the game is played in the form of special cut scenes, where you will have to react according to on-screen cues. You might have to press the analog sticks in certain directions in a sequence or press the L1 and R1 buttons as fast as you can in rapid succession. These actions will get the adrenaline flowing, and there are many scenes that will keep you on the edge of your seat. However, there are quite many of these, and it can get repetitious after having done the same thing over and over.

In contrast, one thing that never gets old is how conversations are handled. When talking to people, you are given a number of dialogue choices, which may very well change the entire course of the game. You only have a limited time to choose, so it ups the ante a little bit, and some intuition has to be utilized to get anywhere in the game.

The infuriating camera, though helping to create a cinematic experience, makes looking and moving around much harder than it needs to be. Camera control is limited to making it pan slightly to the sides, and the sudden changes in perspective make movement frustrating due to the disorienting effect it has on the controls. Because the controls don't adjust to the change in perspective, characters will often move away from where you wish to go unless you quickly change direction you're pushing the analog stick in. It's a huge annoyance throughout the game that makes simple movement a chore. One other slight complaint is the fact that not all missions are equally entertaining. For instance, you are asked to sneak around some guards without being seen. The stealth mechanics presented there are seriously under-developed, and aren't much fun at all. The enemies aren't realistic in the slightest in terms of their observational skills, and will spot you from impossible angles at times. Whenever the game strays from its normal routine it starts to drag on a bit. Some of the sections also require a lot of trial-and-error, often requiring perfect instincts and timing, like when getting rid of evidence when the police is on its way to your apartment.

Even with all these complaints, though, the gameplay is still amazing when it focuses on the story, which the game happens to do. This is as much an interactive piece of fiction as it is a game, and the limitations found in the game are well overshadowed by the narrative itself.

What undoubtedly adds to the story is the great visuals. Yes, this is almost a five-year-old game, but it still looks surprisingly good. The character models are really well done, and motion capture was used in the game's development, which adds much to the realism of character's movement. The surroundings are stunningly detailed, the towering city skyscrapers, the light, falling snow, the realistic architecture and furnishings that abound in the game. The city feels real, dark and gloomy with broken windows, homeless people lie on the street. Nothing is spared in making everything as real as possible. Some of the visuals look slightly muddy in comparison to the HD games of today, but Indigo Prophecy holds up incredibly well, and is still amazing to witness.

The music is equally great, being utterly surreal at some places (for instance, Teddy Pandergrass' Love T.K.O. makes an appearance) and utterly tragic (in a good way) in others. The band Theory of a Deadman is the star of the show, and it's in charge of the credit songs (due to multiple endings, there are many credit songs). They fit the atmosphere perfectly, and are very well performed on top of all that. The voice acting is predictably incredible, seeing as so much emphasis goes into the story, and every character has his or her own voice and feel. This adds even more to the depth of each individual character, and strengthens the effectiveness of the story.

Due to the multiple endings that can be experienced, there is more than enough reason to play through the game again. Even if you're not in the mood to go through the whole game again, you can choose from a large number of different chapters to replay, so getting all the endings isn't something that requires many complete playthroughs. By finding special bonus cards throughout the game, you can earn points you can use to unlock a number of nifty extras, like developer videos and music from the soundtrack. There's enough to do after going through the first game, though there isn't exactly enough drive to play the game all the way through again, due to the more convenient chapter system already available.

The game has a number of gaping flaws, and it might sometimes require some patience to get through the game. However, the experience is more than worth it, and how far Indigo Prophecy strays from the normal conventions of gaming makes it fresh even today. It's definitely a game any admirer of a great story and innovating concepts should try out. When all is said and done, there's no game quite like Indigo Prophecy, and despite all its flaws, it's a great game that should not be overlooked.

Story: 8.0
Graphics: 8.5
Sound: 9.3
Gameplay: 7.6
Replayability: 7.0

Final score: 7.8





Brilliant concept, but falls short of its ultimate vision.

8.5

Superb
Difficulty:
Just Right
Time Spent:
10 to 20 Hours
The Bottom Line:
"Ambitious"

Summary

As a gamer who plays for the story as much as any other aspect of the game, I was intrigued by Indigo Prophecy when it first came out. I bought it, played through a few chapters, and was thoroughly enjoying it, but to make a long story short, I got distracted and put the game back into the closet where it lay forgotten until last week, when I found out that Heavy Rain - a game that I had been very interested in since the original trailer came out - was being made by the same people who made Indigo Prophecy. That jogged my memory, and to pass the time until Heavy Rain came out, I dug through the closet and pulled out the long forgotten game, curious as to what the heck was going on with that story.

It was an ambitious game that hinted at what could be done with storytelling in a video game. Having beat the game, I have to say that the action sequences (which seemed to be inspired by The Matrix) are pretty entertaining, though I found myself not paying as much attention to the action as I would have liked to due to the necessity of keeping my gaze locked on the prompts lest I miss one too many and have to restart from the last save point. It's not too distracting, but there were a couple of times that I was grateful that the main menu lets you watch the action sequences once you've completed them.

The biggest problem I have with the game is not that it wasn't fun - though twitch gamers and people who prefer constant player-defined action in their games might find the game a little slow. Indeed, I applaud Quantic Dream for their focus on story driven games. It's almost as if they've reincarnated the old style PC adventure games with Indigo Prophecy, giving them new life with a modern makeover. No, my main problem with the game lies with a the team not taking enough time to fully flesh out characters and the story line. It gets the job done, but some factions in the game are in some instances only vaguely hinted at until so late in the game that it feels like they were added as a sort of deus ex machina. The same can be said with character arcs - one character seems like his only real role is to provide comic relief since he barely pulls his weight throughout the story. Without spoiling too much, there is a romance that develops very late in the game that comes totally out of the blue simply because what time, energy, and thought throughout the game that the two devoted to each other had absolutely no romantic overtones or undertones.

In short, the problem I had with the game lies fundamentally that the project was a little too ambitious for the technology of the day. The characters are expressive, but not nearly enough to convey the kind of emotions to truly sell the story at the level that it needed to be sold. The story is good, but it had the potential to be amazing, and it needed to be fleshed out a whole lot more. As a result, it was a little disjointed at times, leaving the player wanting a lot more information and story depth than they get.

That said, the game itself is still very enjoyable, and I particularly appreciate the focus on creating an engaging and entertaining story, even if the final project fell short of the development team's ambitions. After all, how does that old saying go? "Reach for the moon, and even if you miss you'll land among the stars."




do you like movies?<br /> will you have come to the right place !!

9.5

Editors' Choice
Difficulty:
Just Right
Time Spent:
10 Hours or Less
The Bottom Line:
"Worth playing"

Summary

do you like movies ?
do you like stories ?
do you like to play awesome games ?
will you have come to the right place

this is the review for INDIGO PROPHECY

presentation :

the game has an AWESOME story great characters and there is some issues but does not effect the game and there is a lot of extras and endings .

graphics :

the snow and the environment are good but the graphics overall was not so good but enough to have fun

sound :

the sound is almost perfect an amazing voice acting and awesome soundtrack and it will be remembered for a long time

gameplay :

the gameplay is one of the best an amazing gameplay and you can explore rooms and attract with almost anything and it has some awesome fights too

game long :

will it's like an 8 hours experience and it's an awesome experience and you will be playing it again for more endings and having fun

and so this is the game an awesome game with an amazing gameplay a must buy game

overall :
9.5




Welcome to the Interactive Cinematic Experience, Fahrenheit.

8.5

Superb
Difficulty:
Easy
Time Spent:
10 Hours or Less
The Bottom Line:
"Ambitious"

Summary

(Just wanted to point out before continuing, I played Fahrenheit, not Indigo Prophecy, but they are apparently the same thing aside from some adult content that was removed.)

I've played many games since my stay here. Some have been amazing, while others downright awful. But one thing that almost never changes for me when it's time to review a game is the set of questions I ask myself before bashing or praising it. "Was it time well spent?", "What did I get out of it?" I'm here to say that although Fahrenheit isn't the best game ever, and it probably isn't going down in history as one, it sure as hell brought something new to the table.

Quantic Dream is the developer behind the game that many are calling "The Interactive Cinematic Experience of a Lifetime". This is probably due to its surprisingly good storyline. Just about any game can tell you one, but not many can immerse you so deep into its world like this one.

You play as Lucas Kain, a man who one day wakes up in a public bathroom after having stabbed a complete stranger to death. The reasons behind this are not only unbeknownst to you, but to the character as well. He has absolutely no idea what's going on. All he knows is that he's just killed a man. And that's where you begin. What do you have to do? Escape, most likely. Yet, something intriguing happens here. The game doesn't actually force you to do anything. It's up to your sense of judgment. This is even more incredible when you realize that you can interact with just about everything around you. You can wash your hands, hide the corpse, get rid of the evidence or just get the hell out of Dodge.

Time passes, events unravel and you progress through the game. If you were sly enough, you got out of the restaurant without turning a single head. Then, the second Act opens, but you're not Lucas Kain anymore. You're playing the role of a detective named Carla and her partner, that got a call about a murder in a restaurant nearby. Just incredible. Incredible how one moment you were committing a murder and the next moment, you're in the shoes of another person investigating that very same crime scene.

If this seems too perplexing at first, it's probably because it is. The fact that you steer the culprit and the cop in the same story is just beyond staggering, because it creates a strange conflict of interest in the player. "Do I want Lucas behind bars or do I want to do everything in my power to save him?"

The game plays like an interactive 7 hour long movie. You control the movements made by the character with the left analog stick, and you use the right analog stick to interact with the things around you. This works by moving the stick in the direction indicated to you by the emergent options on the screen. An example of this would be that if you're standing by a chair and next to a person, an option would appear to sit in the chair or talk to said person.

Aside from that crucial game play element, there is one downside. There are these constant quick time events spread along the entire story. These, depending on whether or not you get them right, can affect the action taken in the moment. If Lucas is playing the guitar, he'll only hit the right notes if you hit the right buttons. This does create tension sometimes, but when it doesn't, it's because it's being just plain annoying. Especially since in some occasions they can even affect the ending you get.

A few more things I wanted to mention before wrapping up this review is the soundtrack, for one. The original score is pretty good, but for some reason, the creators had a strange obsession with the band Theory of a Dead Man. There are actually four songs oddly placed in there.

Finally, one of the biggest flaws I felt this had, was within the very thing that made it so great: The storyline. About halfway through it, it makes a complete change of genre, if that makes any sense. It goes from this awesome, gritty murder mystery, to a corny sci-fi thriller. This is even stranger when they start introducing apparently important characters and confusing plot twists for the first time, way too late in the story. I won't spoil anything for you, but I found it to be very unfortunate considering it started off so well, like something straight out of the Bourne Identity. By the end, I was left staring at the screen going "WTF!", because it didn't feel like the same story I started 7 hours before.

Either way, don't let that stop you from playing it. It's truly a unique experience in a manner of speaking, and it should give you a good idea of what to expect in the future from Quantic Dream.





porque no existiran muchos juegos como estos ...

8.5

Superb
Difficulty:
Just Right
Time Spent:
10 to 20 Hours
The Bottom Line:
"Innovative"

Summary

me encanta esa clase de juegos donde ni bien empiezas no lo puedes dejar y lo acabas en 1 o 2 dias , pues este es uno de ellos , donde la diversion esta asegurada ..
nose de quien fue la idea pero hacer un juego con una interactividad cinematica si que funciona y de verdad como ver una pelicula , lo unico que queria saber es que pasara luego o como acabara ...
lucas kain es poseido por algo en un restaurante y termina matando a un hombre y hara todo por saber que es lo que le pasa mientras que Valenti y Miles trataran de encontrar al culpable , y los mas interesante es la forma en que las historias se crusan , para mi es uno de las mejores tramas que existe en un videojuego , es unico lo unico que se puede decir...
otra cosa es que es un juego unico por su forma de jugabilidad , se puede interactuar con las cosas que nos rodean y en el momento de accion apretar los botones correctos para no perder ..
y lo que mas me gusto es la musica , nose si sera cierto pero por ahi lei que fue hecho por una banda llamada theory of a dead man que le da una ambientacion unica al juego ...

de verdad una joya que talves no es muy conocida y lo mejor de esta clase de juegos que son asi de interesantes es jugarlo con alguien mas y pasar una buena tarde , aparte que tiene 2 finales diferentes ...

si buscamos un sinonimo para " buen videojuego " es este sin duda.

8.4

Superb
8.3
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