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Nice visual and gameplay hack slash RPG.

8.5

Superb
Difficulty:
Just Right
Time Spent:
10 Hours or Less
The Bottom Line:
"Solid"

Summary

Almost feels like RPG Recettear, combination both 2D and 3D environment but in Bastion it has more art visual and graphics animation more better.

In this RPG leveling up does not affect on ability, only health increase. The more affect things and we will use a lot was the point that we gather from item or monster, it can upgrade our skill equipment. We can have two weapon at one times, using left click as first weapon and right click as second weapon. There also ability to worship, where it can give you effect during combat that have plus minus advantage, like you can gather more experience but monster attack will give more damage. There's also ability to upgrade or create building in floating island, there's arsenal where you can change weapon that you will bring along chapter, also blacksmith to upgrading equipment and others.

About gameplay controls, it will takes time to make it works well cause it use both keyboard and mouse cursor as point axis movement. Other notes was in this game you can't rotate the camera but you will get used to it.

The requirement specification to run this game was not so heavy and it the best plus things, I think old computer above 2004 can run this game without flaws.

Other notes, the narrator sometimes makes annoying talking but well its not much problem.




Supergiant Game's debut couldn't be more impressive if it tried

9.5

Editors' Choice
Difficulty:
Just Right
Time Spent:
10 to 20 Hours
The Bottom Line:
"Ambitious"

Summary

Supergiant Game's Bastion can be described in many different ways depending on your understanding of its intent. Some would boil it down to an isometric action-RPG, others would describe it as a quirky story-driven indie game and almost every gamer would call it one of the best looking downloadable titles ever released. And they would be right, but they would also miss the point because Bastion is probably the most mature, well-designed and affecting games you will ever play.

Part of Bastion's maturity comes from its narrative which is communicated by the innovative use of a persistent narrator who comments on every detail of your character "The Kid"s existence. Though it initially comes off as beguilingly cheesy, Logan Cunningham's narration grows in darkness and introspection as the story progresses, acting as a perpetual anchor to Bastion's intriguing tale. There are moments of genuine emotion and grief in Bastion, and Supergiant Games aren't afraid to deal in ambiguity and morality. Considering that every aspect of the tale is communicated through a single omniscient narrator, it's a staggering achievement.

Happily Bastion isn't the kind of game that beats you over the head with its story, the game rarely stops for the story which is vital considering how well designed the gameplay is. At first glance Bastion appears to be an action-RTS in the vein of Diablo or DOTA when in fact it's more akin to a hack n slash action game like God of War. Combat is frantic from the start, you have to balance your barrel rolls, blocking and special moves with your regular attacks to deal with the onslaught of enemies. It's a testament to the entertainment value of the combat that the game manages to trade exclusively in action yet still manage to be interesting after repeated plays.

The devil is truly in the details when it comes to Bastion's combat, the patterns of your attackers, your ability to cancel out of certain moves and the various nuances of the different weapons all give the impression that the attention devoted to the gameplay is closer to that of a Street Fighter than a modern role-playing game, and as a result it surpasses most of the RPG competition in terms of raw gameplay satisfaction.

The game only falls down occasionally during the ranged combat, when the auto-aim sometimes locks on to the wrong target. This issue can be mitigated by playing with the mouse so you can aim precisely but using a keyboard kills the responsiveness of the movement you get from a gamepad.
As an RPG, Bastion deals in meaningful gameplay decisions such as powerful weapon upgrades, passive bonuses and even optional difficulty modifiers rather than meaningful story choices. As you acquire weapons and fragments (the in-game currency) you can radically change the game according to how you want to play it. Upgrades are meaningful, as are the spirits that award passive abilities such as holding extra health potions. It helps that all the weapons and spirits are equally viable to the point where a New game + is almost mandatory for you to discover the other great alternatives to your original choices.

All these decisions are mixed superbly into Bastion's world, certain combinations of weapons will be commented on by the narrator, as will the difficulty-modifying idols to the world's gods. What makes these choices so compelling is their integration into the game-world. Apart from the tangible sense of progression inherent in all RPGs, Bastion makes purely "gamey" aspects of its design a believable part of its universe. For instance, Bastion has combat arenas where you can test your skills against waves of enemies, but playing through "Who knows where" (as they are called) will reveal fascinating story aspects which significantly change how you view certain characters. It's little details like these that show up Supergiant's talent for cohesiveness, nothing in Bastion breaks the atmosphere and tone of its world.

Part of Bastion's identity comes from its artistic design. Mixing intricate 2D backgrounds with a striking colour palette at 60 frames without fail, Bastion's visuals are some of the most arresting in recent memory. Each new world reveals the depth and variety of Bastion's design, from murky bogs to dilapidated forts to a palace of ice, Bastion presents one the most imaginative takes on a "world gone wrong".

Technically Bastion is perfectly stable. The PC version allows for AA support which cleans up some of the edges on the few 3D models that populate the game but otherwise there is little to differentiate the PC version from the 360 one.

As uniformly gorgeous as Bastion is, its music deserves a special mention. Few games have the brass balls to record their own lyrical songs and feature them prominently. There are points in Bastion where music not only permeates the gameplay but also the story, and trust me when I say you will be astonished by their efficacy.

Throughout my time with Bastion, I had to constantly remind myself that it was a $15 indie game and not the product of a developer like Valve. The execution is so faultless, the story and emotional connection so unexpectedly strong and the attention to detail so exact that Bastion stands out as an astounding work of craft. Supergiant Games is a studio to watch, if this is any indication, they have great things ahead of them.






Video and Written Review. Fantastic Development Make Bastion One of the Best Games of the Year.

9.0

Editors' Choice
Difficulty:
Easy
Time Spent:
10 to 20 Hours
The Bottom Line:
"Rocks"

Summary

BASTION - Video Review

++++http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zalZdHC0obk+++++

Don't copy the "+" for the video link.

Bastion is exclusively a downloadable game which was first release as an Xbox Arcade title and then made the transition to the PC a short time later. Bastion's style is second to none through its beauty and amazing sound track. Bastion can also been seen grabbing inspirations from old classics like "The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past" and other games of the middle to late 90's era. Fantastic gameplay and a deeper (yet extremely simply) RPG experience than Zelda has ever had come together in such a harmonistic way that I can only see a bright future for this brand-new amazing Intellectual Property.

The simple score breakdown of "Bastion" is like so…

Graphics/Character Performance and Animation – 10/10

Fun Factor – 9/10

Story – 7/10

Controls- 9/10

User Interfacing – 10/10

Learning Curve – So simple that you can intuitively pick-up and play with complete ease

Sound – 10/10

Value – 7/10

Total – 8.8 / 10
PRESENTATION

Before you ever take a step, before the game fades from black, before anything – you'll hear the narration. Although Bastion is an RPG it doesn't use traditional methods of conveying the game world's persona through person-to-person conversations or through tomes found lying around. Nearly every tidbit of information you'll learn – from the unique aspects of a specific animal's behaviors to the sorrowful past of the main protagonist – is spoken to you from the disembodied voice commenting on nearly every action and reaction you'll have on your surroundings. The somber spoken voice of the narrator is calming and will help lead you along your journey.

In this journey you take control of the silent protagonist dubbed "The Kid" by Rucks the narrator. You'll soon learn that your loved homeland has undergone devastation through the apocalyptic event known only as "the calamity". The world itself seems to have lost the fabric of space that holds it together and sections of the planet are drifting aimlessly away from one another. Most games involve the player trying to prevent a world-destroying event, but Bastion instead begins its' tale after the planet is literally crumbling into fragments. As The Kid you'll search for "cores" and harness these cores' power to attempt putting the pieces of your shattered existence back together.

By a stroke of luck or preparation The Kid is able to find the Bastion. The Bastion is a rendezvous point and landmass seemingly immune to the calamity's anti-matter effects. The Kid wears a piece of the Bastion strapped to his back. This story element is what connects the dots between the beautiful level-design and why the world acts the way it does in response to the Kid. Because the Bastion fragment is on Kid's back he is able to reconstruct the world at his feet as you venture in directions that would otherwise lead to nothingness. The way the beautifully hand painted world comes together is mesmerizing and immerses you in a water colored fantasy realm. Every movement in each direction literally gets you one step closer to making the world whole once again as it forms under your feet with the power of Bastion.

The overall presentation of Bastion is simply stunning. Everything from the way each artistic element is incorporated into the next makes the game feel as though it is seamless and came from a single person's mind. The intimate connection of the narration and the way the music was blended with the story feels organic and harmonizes with the vibrant colored tones of the world surrounding you. All of the artistic avenues of Bastion come together to make the different facets of the audio and visual experience of Bastion a delight throughout the game's entirety and a unique one at that.

GAMEPLAY

The Kid's main on-screen meters of import are his health bar, ammo capacity (if you're toting a weapon with rounds), and the amount of flasks you have for restoring health and executing special abilities. You'll need to keep a close eye on your number of potions to restore your total health. To regain maximum HP you can either hit your flask button to take a swig or walk over a potion when you're potion carrying capacity is maxed-out. If your potions are at max and you walk over one of the many potions enemies will drop when they're killed you can recover from some battle wounds.

The enemies of the Bastion don't only drop potions for your health. Enemies also drop flasks to give you more pulls off your special ability talent and also crystals. Crystals are like the currency of Bastion. The crystals are small core fragments that can be used to help rebuild your safe haven, the Bastion, and crystals are also used to up-grade many different aspects of The Kid's arsenal and augmentations.

The augmentations the kid can undergo are when you visit your distillery to partake in some "spirits". Drinking these distilled beverages has different beneficial effects like; increasing your health potion carrying capacity, increasing the rate of critical strikes by a large amount when your health is below 33%, or even saving you from the brink of death when an attack would have otherwise killed you. You'll open an additional pocket to carry more distilled spirits with you each level. Besides a small health increase the additional space to carry more spirits is the only benefit to increasing in level.

Like I said before, the crystal fragments are used to improve the Kid's arsenal. You'll have a variety of eleven different weapons to accompany you when you journey out into the hostile crumbling landscapes outside the confines of Bastion. The weapons have a variety of different uses and capabilities. For example, the dual pistols are fast and can eventually ricochet bullets around, the machete is extremely fast and can cause bleeding for damage over time, or the mortar can launch over obstacles to hit a group for massive area of effect damage. Each weapon has its purpose and most of their strengths to weaknesses feel balanced. The Kid can only carry two weapons at any given time when venturing out or after visiting an arsenal out in the fragmented wastes of Bastion. My only gripe with the weapons of Bastion is that only three of the eleven are melee and the other eight are ranged weapons.

Combat in Bastion is a blast. I enjoyed testing each of the eleven different weapons and finding what suited my play style best. There are also a TON of different special abilities to accompany weapons like; the whirlwind for your hammer, projecting a specter of yourself to eviscerate enemies with the machete's ghost blade, or even general specials that don't require a specific weapon-type like a shield wall or hucking a grenade. No matter what different special ability, weapons, or spirits you bring along with you to customize your Kid, combat will always have the same core basics. You'll always have your evasive roll for squandering enemy attacks and your best friend – the shield. The shield plays a very important part to Bastion's combat because there is simply a lot happening on-screen at any given moment and thankfully your shield can protect you from most assaults. Also, if you tap the block button a second before something is about to strike you then you can reflect a projectile back at the foe or even stagger a melee attacker which will stun them for a moment leaving them vulnerable.

After you get to a fairly high level, have some weapons maxed with enhancements, and are supporting some of the best distilled spirits the game's encounters and foes can feel like they're getting a bit too easy. Thank goodness for "God Alters". By paying homage to these different god tributes from within the temple you'll be able to make the game more rewarding. The God Alters might do different beneficial effects to the enemies you encounter. Alters are essentially like adding a hard, super hard, and rip your hair out hard mode to the game depending on how many alters you have activated simultaneously and the more you activate the more experience points and crystals you get per kill. God Alters might do things like make an enemy drop a tiny grenade after each one dies, randomly reflect your attack, take less damage, or even have fast health regeneration. If you're up for the challenge Bastion is there to answer.

All of these different in-game items like God Alters, weapon enhancements, spirits, and special abilities can be gather by finding items out in the hostile landmasses or by doing game challenges. Game challenges are very small platform levels where you go to test your prowess with a specific weapon. One challenge might ask of you to protect monuments with your calamity launcher for a given period of time, shot "X" amount of floating spores as the pathway beneath your feet crumbles away or even flamethrow hundreds of birds while they try to overwhelm you.

All of these different elements of varied enemies, weapons, special abilities, weapon enhancements, God alters, and spirits come together to create a surprisingly deep Action-RPG experience. Bastion's combat is fantastic and filled with momentum and the RPG aspects of the game very satisfactory. And, because all of bastion's aspects are so entertaining with combat, visuals, music, storytelling, and a challenge you'll be more than happy to spend an additional six hours to play through the game again when the 'new game plus' unlocks after your first playthrough. New game plus allows everything you earned in your previous game to be carried over and further improve The Kid's arsenal, unlock all of the spirit slots, and find all of the God Shrines…I know I didn't get 100% on all of those on my first time through Bastion. Bastion was definitely intended to be played through more than once; even the narrator might mention something feels a bit like Deja' Vu.

TROUBLESOME ISSUES

Although I believe Bastion is the best exclusively downloadable game I may have ever played, it still has some irksome fumbles here and there.

Frustratingly Bastion has an extremely limited game save space. I'm talking VERY limited. You can only save one game per copy. There is absolutely not more than one space for an extra person to play through or even a space for you to play through on a fresh adventure without erasing your only other saved game's progress.

There are some hiccups with the shield blocking mechanic and auto-targeting with the shield, but it isn't really worth getting into.

My single biggest gripe with Bastion was its anticlimactic ending. Not only did the game not really support too many encounters that you could really consider "bosses", but even the last stage was fairly weak. Instead of an intense final stage with overwhelming odds and a magnitude of enemy forces baring down on the Kid you end up getting the slowest and most unchallenging act of the entire game. The final stage is separated into several sections, but the last one is tedium at its finest. The Kid is tasked with carrying a large log-like totem-thing and it makes him walk very slowly. You can't use the weapons you've been enjoying throughout the entire game and instead are forced to use the totem's ridiculously overpowered attacks. Each attack will kill any foe instantly in one attack and if that wasn't literally overkill enough you can left-click for an area of effect ground explosion or even hit your special ability button to unleash a firestorm from the heavens. Sounds kind of cool, but every button felt like an "I win" button and I never even came close to feeling like at any point I was in danger or at the end of a game that had previously been getting exponentially harder as I went on. It was sadly a sour bite to end an otherwise extremely delicious meal.

ALL IN ALL

All in all, Bastion is an extremely entertaining magnificent game in every facet that a video game can entertain. Sight, sound, story, and gameplay are all topnotch and Bastion delivers on the aspects a game claiming to be an action-RPG should deliver on. Bastion puts most of its eggs in the action basket, but it's got great character customization through augmenting the Kid with "spirits" and a nice variety in weapons, special abilities, and enemy-types to keep the game feeling fresh throughout its entirety and make RPG gamers feel at home. Although Bastion has these different deep gaming elements the RPG features and combat are still so simply implemented and easy to understand that anyone could get a handle on it. Bastion feels like it wants to remind everyone of some classic games, but ultimately Bastion separates itself from the games that may have inspired some of its aspects by carving its' own place amongst the hierarchy of games that will stand the test of time with this superb entry into the gaming industry.




Narrated in a way that is hard to forget, Bastion will always be a game that is easy to remember

9.0

Editors' Choice
Difficulty:
Just Right
Time Spent:
10 to 20 Hours
The Bottom Line:
"Hard to describe"

Summary

Through our long and winding journey on the gaming world, we get to experience more games than we can count, and due to biological quirk in the way our brains have been engineered, the memories we have regarding those experiences will most likely fade away in time and we will hold on to one or two details of the game that will happen to trigger a bunch of memories related to how wonderful that gaming adventure was. In the end, the games that stick on our minds as the most delightful ones are titles that are able to stamp memories in our brains that are unique, therefore causing a powerful sense of awe to emerge when those mementos are brought forth in our minds. Every remarkable piece of software has a signature stamp: the spheric worlds of Super Mario Galaxy, the mesmerizing 3-D dungeons of Ocarina of Time, the discovery of how your weapon works in Portal, just to mention a few. Bastion, as it turns out, is one of those games that is bound to be remembered very dearly by most who give it a shot, not because of its flooring visuals, not because of its great gameplay, but because of how the developers chose to tell their story.

"Now here is a kid whose world got all twisted, leaving him stranded on a rock in the sky", players will hear from a deep rough distant voice as they glimpse Bastion's world for the first time. At this point, it is likely most people will sit back and ready themselves for some narrated storytelling, but after a few seconds of silence players will grow impatient and try to move the kid. To their surprise, the kid will get up, and deep rough voice will come back narrating the kid's action with detail. As you walk out of your stranded rock, the world will start building itself as you go in a fantastic real-time arranging of blocks and objects that will form beautiful scenarios as you go, and as you move down the hallway the narrator will keep talking and describing not only the kid's actions, but his thoughts, his past, his present and what is going on in the world around him.

Bastion could be one of those immersive lonely games that put a sole warrior against all perils of the world, but instead, it chooses to be a game whose main character will always be accompanied by an omnipresent voice. Most games will put breaks on gameplay to explain the story to players, but in Bastion the story is laid out as the gameplay moves forward. You will be battling hordes of enemies while listening to important reveals, location details and your character's thoughts, it is possibly the first time ever in the history of gaming where players will feel as if they have been transported into a third-person fable. The narrator is an integral part of the Bastion experience, and it adds layers and layers of dense atmosphere to an already impressive game, as not only will it make sure to point out how mighty the kid is as a warrior, but it will also foretell tense gameplay moments by dropping quotes like "He then notices he is being watched" or "Little did he know what was waiting for him ahead", it is a feature that, therefore, goes beyond its storytelling purpose, but it also leaks into the gameplay.

Limiting the game's praise to its most amazing feature would be unfair to the game, though. As you will come to learn, the world of Bastion has been destroyed by an event called the Calamity, and as it had been agreed, in case of emergency, all people should run towards the city's Bastion. However, upon arriving in the vicinity, the kid only finds an old man who tells him the Bastion must be rebuilt, and to do so the kid must travel to different locations in the world – that have been ripped out of the earth and tossed into the sky as floating islands – in order to acquire powerful cores whose power will rebuild the Bastion and unlock its mysterious power. As you would expect, initially the story leaves a lot of questions unanswered, but as time goes by and your journey progresses, narration will make sure to enlighten you on what exactly happened that brought forth so much doom upon the world.

With the excuse for adventure set up, it is time to step outside and see what Bastion is all about, and players will find a nice blend of RPG elements with a hack and slash gameplay presented in an isometric view. The game has a considerably large arsenal that grows as the kid reaches new locations, and all weapons are either melee tools or long-range guns, since the game allows players to choose two weapons and a special skill before going out into the wild, it is possible to always set out with a balanced character, something that is absolutely vital since the game's enemies are unforgiving and have different sorts of attacks that are best handled with one specific kind of weapon. Character customization, is not limited to two weapons you can take to a new location, though. As your level rises, you open up new spots in your inventory where magic potions can be placed that will give the kid certain abilities, such as increasing his critical hit ratio, giving him a few extra chances to continue the game after dying, avoiding strikes that would have killed him, and so on, for a game that is ten hours long, this amount of possibilities is unexpected but very welcome. As if that wasn't enough, earning money and finding unique materials will allow the kid to use the Bastion's forge to upgrade the many weapons in him arsenal. Bastion puts many bigger and more ambitious RPGs to shame when it comes to inventory customization.

The game's levels are absolutely mesmerizing on their visuals; everything seems to have been hand-painted by a very talented artist. There are only a few games out there who are able to rival Bastion on the art direction department. Watching the world of Bastion move is like witnessing delicate tridimensional character models wandering around and waging battles on a flat painting, this contrast between 3-D and 2-D is a sight to behold when players are not to busy slashing hordes of dangerous enemies coming from every side and launching different attacks. By offering a more strategic variation of the hack and slash gameplay, Bastion could have fallen victim to lack of variety in the way its levels are designed, but the developers were smart enough to add a few unique characteristics that make the levels stand out on their own, even though your central activity in all of them is pretty much the same: beating down enemies and avoiding death at all cost, because dying will invariably mean going back to the beginning of the level and having to come up with a more careful strategy as to how to get to your goal and back home while minimizing the damage your character takes.

The game's core issue will only make itself present to gamers who do not have a joystick. Bastion's control configuration for mouse and keyboard users is very flexible, but as well as you might set it up, chances are a few problems will come up. The main shortcoming here is that the character will only attack towards the side where the mouse pointer is, meaning that two hands will not be enough to move the character with the arrows, aim with the mouse pointer and attack with the keyboard button of choice. It is a problem that cannot be solved, simply because it is not something players can get used to, but it is something that must be dealt with with a certain cost, which in this case is taking damage on the interval between properly aiming and being able to launch your attack. Needless to say, it is a situation that can cause a certain amount of frustration because nobody wants to go back to the beginning of the level when they feel it was not their fault, but the control's.

As a downloadable game, Bastion's length is quite respectful, clocking in at about six hours for those who rush through the adventure. Besides, the game is very successful in inviting players for another round of enemy obliteration with their previous XP and equipment upgrades intact. Not only does the game feature multiple endings, collectible objects that add depth to the story when acquired, and situations where the narration will change according to your actions, it also allows players to tweak with its difficulty by going into the Bastion's sanctuary and selecting options, such as making enemies attack faster. If that doesn't feel like quite enough, there are also specific challenges for each weapon acquired that demand players to kill all enemies within an arena in a certain amount of time, testing the skills of experienced gamers in exchange for nice prizes. With all of that, it is easy to see that Bastion could become a fifteen-hour game in the hands of dedicated fans. It is hard to find a title that gives this much value to players' money.

At this point in time, it is impossible to point out Bastion's place in history, other than saying it is one of the best downloadable games to ever reach any gaming system available out there. But one thing is for sure, its gameplay, vast array of options, artistic visuals that blow minds away will be forever remembered by those who go through it when they recall the game's amazing mean of storytelling, and the main feature that makes it stand out from ever single game ever released, its brilliant narration that puts players in the very center of a story and gives all elements of the world of Bastion unforgettable depth and value.




Something that can touch the heart of any gamer.

9.0

Editors' Choice
Difficulty:
Easy
Time Spent:
10 to 20 Hours
The Bottom Line:
"Masterpiece"

Summary

To fully enjoy this game you must have an open mind to a story and story telling. The narration is spectacular and grows on you quickly. At first I thought that the game could have gone with less narration, but by the middle of my first time playing through it I felt that the voice that guides and entertains you is a vital part of the game. It adds a new, unique twist. The music is very good. Excellent in fact. I have yet to buy the album, but I have got on and played the game for the sake of listening to the music multiple times.
As far as game play goes, its varied and addicting. As you progress in the game you get new weapons which each work differently and require different styles of combat. You only get to choose 2 weapons at a time when you head off to a mission, which adds a bit of strategy and a feeling of weakness. I think its really exciting to only have 2 weapons.
The graphics are very bright and beautiful and add a feeling of how much time was put into the environment alone. the way that the ground lays itself down as you walk across the path is very original the well thought through.
I honestly love everything about this game: the story; the game play; the music; the art work; and that rare feeling of sadness that you get after completing an amazing game. I am a guy who is very slow to tears, but this game touched me and when the credits began to roll I couldn't help but reflect on the great time I had and cry a little.
I recommend this game to anyone who is anybody. 9/10 and that is a big score for me, i am usually pretty critical about games and the ratings I give them.
8.5

Superb
8.7
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